Infractions, Misdemeanors and Felonies, Oh My! – Part 3

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The criminal system divides crimes into three main categories, depending on the severity, to determine how the court system will handle the case and what punishment is imposed. The three categories include Infractions, Misdemeanors and Felonies. In our “Infractions, Misdemeanors & Felonies – Oh My! Series,” we’ve taken a closer look at Infractions and Misdemeanors. Our final installment in this series will focus on Felonies.

Felonies are the most serious of crimes and are punishable by imprisonment in state prison or death. Florida classifies felony offenses in five degrees and is classified based on the maximum penalty allowed by law should one be found guilty of the associated crime. Florida utilizes the Criminal Punishment Code (CPC) scoring system to determine the Offense Level points and minimum allowable sentence for all felony crimes. Basically, the more serious the crime, the higher the score. There are additional factors that are taken into consideration in determining the Offense Level.

Felony in the Third Degree
A felony in the third degree is punishable by no more than five years imprisonment in a state prison, probation up to five years, and a fine of up to five thousand dollars. In addition, the defendant may also be ordered to pay the victim restitution as ordered by the court.

Felony in the Second Degree
A felony in the second degree is punishable by no more than fifteen years imprisonment in a state prison, probation up to fifteen years and a fine of up to ten thousand dollars. In addition, the defendant may also be ordered to pay the victim restitution as ordered by the court.

Felony in the First Degree

A felony in the first degree is punishable by no more than thirty years imprisonment in a state prison, probation up to thirty years and a fine of up to ten thousand dollars. In addition, the defendant may also be ordered to pay the victim restitution as ordered by the court.

Life Felony
A life felony is punishable by forty years to life imprisonment in a state prison, without the possibility of parole, or probation and a fine of up to fifteen thousand dollars. In addition, the defendant may also be ordered to pay the victim restitution as ordered by the court.

Capital Felony
A capital felony is punishable by death or life imprisonment with out the possibility of parole in a state prison. In addition, the defendant may also be ordered to pay the victim restitution as ordered by the court.

Being convicted of a felony can have severe consequences. In this stressful and often scary situation, you need someone on your side who will work vigorously to ensure that your rights are protected and that the law is not misused against you. If you are facing a potential felony charge in Florida, you should talk to an experienced criminal defense attorney about your case. D’Lugo and DeFlora, P.A. can help you understand your options and obtain the best possible outcome in your case.

Call us for a consultation today at 407.870.5551 or online at www.KissimmeFamilyLaw.com.

 

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